Direct Mail Tracking & ROI Success Indicators

Smiling woman removing mail from mailbox

Personal. Reliable. Trustworthy. Useful. These are all words that have recently been used to describe direct mail. Direct mail is a powerful marketing and fundraising tool. A key to its success lies in tracking response and measuring results. If you have no way of knowing what a recipient does once they receive your mailer, you can’t know the true value that mailer holds for your target audience. So, what do we measure? And how do we make mail trackable and measurable? The following measurements and tracking strategies can apply to for profit businesses and nonprofit organizations alike.

4 Key Measurements

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Business vector created by Iconicbestiary – Freepik.com

As with any marketing strategy, it’s best to begin your direct mail campaign by defining your goals. In a general sense, you’re likely looking to increase business or generate leads. But it’s important to be specific when targeting the message of your direct mail piece. Do you want to increase traffic to your physical storefront? Are you looking to drive recipients to a landing page on your website? Or, are you working to encourage event attendance?

Say you send out a direct mail campaign advertising your company as a service provider. Soon after, you start to see an uptick in business. This is the result you want, right? But it may be impossible to tell what effect your mail campaign had on growth of business or if the piece accomplished what you wanted it to.

And, if you don’t know how successful or unsuccessful your direct mail campaign was, it’s impossible to plan or improve your strategy in the future.

Once you know what you want to achieve, the following indicators can be used to calculate the results of your mail campaign.

Response Rate

This refers to the percentage of recipients who responded to your mail piece. Simply divide number of responses by number of mail pieces sent to get the response rate.

Conversion Rate

This is the next level up from Response Rate. More people are likely to respond to the mailer than those who eventually convert to customers (or donors.) Depending on what you’re selling, the conversion rate may be low, or it may take a longer period of time to achieve a conversion from your mailing. Conversion rate is calculated by dividing the number of actual orders you receive by the number of responses you got.

Cost per Acquisition (CPA)

CPA refers to the amount it cost you to obtain each new customer. Divide your campaign cost by the number of orders you received to determine CPA. You may find it helpful to compare the CPA for your direct mail campaign with that of your other marketing endeavors, as it will allow you to understand which channel achieves the most business for your market.

Return on Investment (ROI)

ROI is the baseline for your campaign—how financially successful was this mailing? ROI is calculated by subtracting the cost of your campaign from the revenue generated and then dividing by the campaign cost.

As you get deeper into the measurement process, there are several other metrics you may want to measure.

6 Tracking Techniques

Now that you know what you’re measuring and how you’ll use your data, let’s look at 6 ways you can implement tracking into a mail piece.

1) Coupons

direct mail postcard hair cut couponsEveryone loves to feel that they’re getting a good deal. Depending on the nature of your business, a coupon offer can entice prospects who may not otherwise have visited you. I can think of several occasions when food coupons I received in the mail led me to a restaurant, sometimes one I was familiar with and often somewhere completely new. Your mailing could be a single coupon, or it could include several offers, allowing you to see which resonates most with your mail list.

If your business has several locations, it may be helpful to include a coupon code so that each location can process the coupons the same way, and you’ll accurately collect data for that mailing. Codes also make online purchases and purchases through apps easier to implement and track for coupons.

2) The Mail

Like coupons, where the recipient could bring the physical coupon in to your business, you could require recipients to bring in the mailer itself to receive the offer. For instance, you may be offering a free consultation. The recipient can only receive that free consultation when they bring the postcard along on their visit. That way, you’ll know exactly who responded to the campaign, since they’ll be handing over the addressed piece.

3) URLs

If you want to drive traffic to your website, you can create a landing page and URL specific to the mail campaign on your company’s site. Then, print that URL prominently on your direct mail piece. Visitors will come to the page directly from the mailing, so you can accurately track how effective the mail piece was at achieving your goal.

Personalized URLs (PURLs) are another option to explore. PURLs are customized to each recipient on your mail list. For example, for a contractor, a PURL could look like this: www.contractors.com/jane-doe. The content Jane would see if she goes to her PURL would be customized to her, with her name and offers specific to her needs and interests.

4) QR Codes

phone scanning qr code
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You can use a QR code in the same way as a URL. Print a QR code on your mailer that, when scanned, brings recipients to a landing page customized to the mailing. When you track how many people visited that landing page, you’ll know how many people responded to your mailing.

5) Customized Phone Number

It’s also possible to create a custom phone number for your mailing campaign, if you’d prefer recipients call in to talk to someone at your business regarding the mailing offer. You can make it a point to track when a call comes in regarding the mailer. However, you’re likely receiving several calls throughout the day regarding all aspects of your business. To make it easier, you can set up a number separate from your regular business number that will forward to a separate line. Then, you’ll know any calls coming through that line are specific to your mailing campaign.

6) A/B Split

digital artwork two open laptopsIf you’re looking to track what resonates with your recipients, an A/B split can be helpful. Design your mail piece, then create a second version that differs by just one element, such as the headline, image, or language in the call to action. Split your mailing list in half, mailing version A to the first half and version B to the rest. You’ll need a way to track responses to determine which version that respondent received. This strategy can give you a sense of what language, offers, message, etc. connects with your audience, allowing you to plan and execute better targeted campaigns.

Tracking and measuring data from marketing campaigns provides you with invaluable information about your marketing strategy, your prospect list, and your prospect’s response to your product/service offerings. Sometimes an offer you thought would be a home run falls flat, while a mailer you weren’t expecting to stand out receives an overwhelming response. Any relevant and legitimate data that you collect from measuring will help you to better reach your audience with more personalized, compelling offers in the future.

Ready to step up your direct mail campaigns? From list work and design to printing and mail fulfillment, think Paw Print. Give us a call at 802-865-2872…we make it easy!

Direct Mail Works: Enhance Your Fundraising Appeal

woman reading mail at deskOne of the biggest reasons people don’t give is from a feeling of futility—how can my contribution really make a difference?

To turn this feeling around, you must show a donor how important they as an individual are to your cause. A personal way to do so that continues to get results is direct mail. A direct mail piece that sends the right message, to the right recipient, at the right time, is a compelling and effective way to connect with your target audience.

But what makes a powerful mail piece?

Let’s look at a recent appeal mailing from Giffords PAC, an organization working to end gun violence founded by former Congresswoman and shooting survivor Gabby Giffords.

Part 1: Personal Letters

The contents of the mailer include two personal and visually powerful letters. The first is from Gabby Giffords herself, and the second is from her husband, Mark Kelly.

direct mail fundraising lettersThere are several tactics that make these letters compelling, starting with the opening sentences. In Giffords’ letter, her lead-in reads,

“The man who tried to kill me shot 18 other people that morning.

Six died. One of them was a nine-year-old girl.”

There is no build up to this, no context, which makes it more powerful. The true story on its own is enough to catch and hold our attention, as well as bringing us right into the issue central to Giffords PAC.

Kelly begins his letter with his own visually compelling and personal story. “I always thought I had a risky job” he states, going on to tell us of his 39 Desert Storm combat missions and four trips into space. To the average person, that’s risky stuff, and it helps to pique our interest in Kelly. But he continues on to root risk in the everyday world. Most of us will never travel to space. But the “more present danger” that Giffords faced, that of being shot, is, unfortunately, very real.

The openers are different for both letters, but they work to convey the same message in a compelling, personal way – gun violence is real, mass shootings are happening, and we are all at risk.

Data

Both letters also make powerful and effective use of data to send their message. In Kelly’s letter he states that “every year, 34,000 people are killed with guns” which is a horrifying statistic. Giffords cites the same statistic, but she says, “this year, 34,000 people will die from gun violence.” It’s a powerful statistic for both letters, but the language Giffords uses makes it feel more urgent—these people “will die” due to the current state of gun control, which I feel is a powerful motivator to support the call to action later in the letter.

Throughout the rest of Kelly’s letter, he incorporates statistics in a way that helps to build the story. It’s easy to get bogged down with numbers. And, it’s also easy to fall into an overly emotional tone without evidence to back you up. Kelly is effective at using data to strengthen his story and make a compelling case. His story is better because of the data, and the data is more compelling because of his story.

3 C’s of Marketing

Kelly and Giffords invoke the 3 C’s of Marketing in each of their letters: Context, Community, and Clarity. Their lead-ins set the context of the mailer and the mission of the organization. They build the body of the letter by developing a community-centric tone. Kelly writes that “right here in our country,” “simple every day events” make us question the safety of our homes, schools, and communities. Gun violence is a national issue, but it impacts Americans on a local scale, shattering communities. Kelly successfully creates the sense that GIffords PAC is a community of concerned Americans that aren’t just looking for financial support. They truly want the donor, as an individual, to become a part of their community. “Gabby and I are counting on you,” Kelly says at the end of his letter.

As for the last C, Clarity, it’s clear what Giffords PAC is counting on the donor to do. The issue and the facts are clearly stated, as are the successes they’ve achieved, their long-term goals, and what you as the donor can do and stand for.

Donor-Centric

While both letters talk about gun control and Giffords PAC, they are centered on the donor. The letters make liberal use of the words “we,” “our,” and “you,” the last of which is a critical piece. Using “you” helps the letters speak directly to the recipients. In Giffords’ letter she writes, “now more than ever, I need you.”  And Kelly tells us “our voice will be so much stronger if you’ll be there beside us.” Both poise the donor as pivotal to the solution.

P.S.

P.S. to letter

Did you know that the P.S. is the second most read part of a letter after theopening sentence? Kelly includes a P.S. at the end of his letter that succinctly summarizes his main ideas, and emphasizes that we, as Americans, are the only ones who can enact change by demanding better gun control laws from our elected leaders. Even if a reader skipped over the body of the letter, this P.S. clearly states the issue at hand with a call to action that makes the reader a pivotal piece of the solution.

Part 2: Action Steps

In addition to the letters, this mailing included two pieces tied to direct action. The letters make the case for Giffords PAC and are followed up with action-oriented content.

yellow call to action slipThe first is a yellow slip with a bold headline: Washington Must Find the Courage to Take Action! It echoes the tone of the letters—we will not stand by while gun violence happens, and we demand that leaders act. Then follows a list of clear steps that elected leaders can follow that Giffords PAC believes would achieve greater gun safety.

Part of what makes this piece of the mailing strong are the details. This slip cites specific actions for leaders to take and specific legislation that should and should not be a part of solving the crisis of gun violence. It gives the impression that this organization is clear in its goals, understands the situation, and has identified clear solutions. There is no passive language here. Action-oriented words are key to making this slip work.

donation slip direct mail fundraisingThe second action piece in this mailing is the donation slip. Again, the purpose here is clearly stated to help reiterate what your contribution will do. The recipient’s name and address are printed on the slip as well. All a donor has to do is check the box indicating the amount of the gift.

Another effective and personal touch is the photo of Giffords and Kelly that appears in the upper right corner. It is always helpful to put a face to a name and better know who you are supporting and working with. This slip offers multiple ways to give, too. You can mail this slip back to Giffords PAC or “put your money to work right away” at the web link printed on the bottom.

Letters to political leadersBeneath the donation slip itself are three letters to the President, Speaker of the House, and the Senate Leader for donors to sign. Giffords PAC takes on the work of ensuring these reach these government leaders. It’s an easy way to start making donors feel involved in the cause.

Part 3: Remittance Envelope

remittance envelopeIncluding a remittance envelope in the mailing makes the process one step easier for recipients. The envelope requires no additional postage to be mailed. Many donors today choose to give online. However, including a remittance envelope is a nice courtesy that makes it convenient for recipients to take action.

Need help with your direct mail or fundraising campaign? At Paw Print, we specialize in direct mail appeal production. Contact us to start reaching more donors today.

Effectively Reaching the Modern Donor

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Charitable giving has long been a part of the human experience. The first record of individuals giving back was in 2500 BCE, when the Hebrews instated a mandatory tax used to benefit the poor. In the U.S., philanthropy dates to 1643, when Harvard held the first American fundraising drive, raising 500 pounds.

In 2016, a total of $390.05 billion was gifted to charities around the world. The history of charitable giving is not only long, but full of change. And it’s not done changing yet.

The fundraising landscape is constantly shifting, as new technologies and demographic trends affect both the ways donors give and who is giving. A recent trend is the dominance of the “Modern Donor.”

The 2018 Modern Donor Contours Report describes this group as a combination of Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millennial donors. Modern Donors have taken over the giving process from the Silent Generation, donors age 72 and over. This group has defined the giving process in the past. But younger generations are changing the methods the average donor uses to give and the ways that nonprofits need to fundraise.

How Donors Give

According to the 2017 Global Trends in Giving report, 61% of donors prefer giving online. While this does mean it’s essential to have a website that is easy to navigate, it doesn’t mean placing all your eggs in the online basket. In fact, when direct mail and web are combined, nonprofits see an average 27% response rate. When you add email to the mix, that figure jumps to 37%. So, donors favor online giving. But their decision to give is bolstered by communications across multiple channels, including direct mail, social media, and face-to-face conversations.

girl holding box of clothes reading "donations"
Business image created by Peoplecreations – Freepik.com

Other notable statistics—half of donors are inspired to give from social media and fundraising events. In the past year, two-thirds of donors volunteered with a nonprofit, and 60% of donors attended a fundraising event. Creating an opportunity for current and potential donors to physically go to your event and interact in person with your employees and beneficiaries is hugely helpful to the giving process.

The Emergence of the Modern Donor

What does a Modern Donor look like?

Silent Generation donors tend to be passive. They wait for the organization to reach out to them, and they’ll respond with a gift. Not so with Modern Donors. This group is more active, interacting with organizations across multiple channels. They operate on their own timeline, whether or not that coincides with your organization’s timeline. It’s important to listen closely to donors, examine feedback, and work to engage your donors the ways they want to engage, even if it’s not the way your organization has preferred to engage in the past.

Is Word of Mouth still what it used to be?

two smiling women drinking tea and speaking in office
Business image created by Katemangostar – Freepik.com

It’s a trend across fundraising and marketing—word of mouth consistently rates as a top way individuals make giving and purchasing decisions. Modern Donors rely heavily on the opinions and experiences of other individuals in their network. 91% of those surveyed for the Contours Report cited networks and self-discovery as the main ways they learned about nonprofits and chose to give. In contrast, only 9% of first-time donors chose to give due to receiving materials from the charity or organization itself. A person’s “network” can consist of conversations with friends and family, or of celebrity influencers they follow on social media. Place your efforts in creating positive, personal experiences for each of your donors. They’ll have good things to say about your organization and its efforts, helping to create a favorable impression of you among potential donors.

Will potential donors research your organization?

Millennials are nearly twice as likely to do research about an organization than their Silent Generation counterparts. More tech savvy and more influenced by word of mouth, Modern Donors seek to get to the truth of what an organization has done and how it has helped others. Make any studies, reports, stories, and statistics regarding your organization readily available on your website. Ensure you’re gathering data you can report on. Make it easy for researching donors to find this information, as it can heavily influence their decision to give.

What’s the impact of a social media presence?

As stated above, half of donors are inspired to give from social media content. Social media also creates a place for discussion and for people to share their personal experiences with your organization. Modern Donors are big on sharing that they made a gift as soon as possible. 54% of those surveyed said they share charitable giving with their network, with nearly 60% of Millennials doing so.

What channels do donors engage with?

The Modern Donor is connected across multiple channels and is not influenced as significantly by outbound fundraising strategies like direct mail. While direct mail is an essential part of fundraising, the Contours report indicates that direct mail may be better suited for communications with repeat donors, who are looking for regular, personal updates about your nonprofit.

Instead, the website was cited as the main point of conversion for Modern Donors. However, because they are engaged across several channels, it’s important both that you have a multi-channel engagement strategy and that the strategy is consistent in theme, message, and appearance across channels. Modern Donors want a seamless experience.

How loyal is loyal?

An important fact to remember regarding Modern Donors is that they are “nearly loyal.” As a nonprofit, your goal is to build a donor base that consistently gives to your organization from year to year. These “truly loyal” donors are essential. But you should note that 50% of Modern Donors will regularly give to 2 or more organizations in addition to yours. And, they’ll frequently give to a different nonprofit from year to year rather than consistently giving to the same one. To improve donor retention, word of mouth can be helpful. Focus on turning your truly loyal donors into brand ambassadors, working to educate their networks about your organization and converting one-time donors into regular contributors.

What donor and giving trends are your nonprofit seeing? Let us know!

Nonprofit Promo Enhances Fundraising

Promotional products have been around for a long time. And they’re becoming ever more prevalent and desired. 80% of us have at least one promotional product, and over half will use that item at least once per week. Promo is a sure-fire way to enhance marketing strategy, helping nonprofits to achieve goals and generate more fundraising dollars.

4 Reasons Promo Benefits Nonprofits

1) Increase Brand Awareness

A major function of promotional products is to make prospective donors aware of your brand. Any item with your logo or message printed on it is a chance to increase awareness and recognition of your nonprofit’s brand and mission. High-visibility items like bags, apparel, or bumper stickers allow your donors to show their support for your organization. At the same time, individuals who aren’t associated with your nonprofit may begin to see your brand more frequently, inspiring them to learn more about your mission.

promotional product statistics

2) Generate Revenue

Promotional products make effective and attractive giveaways. They are also a potential source of revenue for your organization. If your nonprofit has a popular motif or tagline, you can sell items to individuals who are passionate about your mission and want to represent you in their day to day activities.

3) Incentivize

Sometimes it may be appropriate to incorporate promotional items into the gifting process. For instance, you can set up a tier of gifting, so that each donor who gives up to a certain amount receives a certain item, like a mug. From there, donors who give up to the next tier receive a larger item, like a shirt. Many of your donors may choose to give regardless. However, the promo item gives a further incentive to do so while thanking them with a nice gift they can use to further promote your brand.

4) Recognize and Thank Donors

Your donors give because your organization has special meaning for them. They’re the lifeblood of your nonprofit, making it possible for you to continue your good work and further your mission. You can use promotional products to show your appreciation for your donors and recognize the importance of their contribution. Via direct mail, you can send your top donors a thank you gift, like a stainless-steel tumbler or a fleece jacket. Include a handwritten note to make it extra personal, or explore variable data printing to customize the item with the donor’s name.

Promo Tips

A study by ASI, the Advertising Specialty Institute, found that the average cost per impression for a TV advertisement was 2.5 cents. In contrast, the average cost per impression for promotional products was just 0.7 cents. The financial benefits of promotional products are clear. But there are a few things you should consider before investing in promo for your nonprofit.

First, ask yourself why you are using promo. What are your goals? As with any marketing strategy, to understand the effectiveness of using promotional products, it’s essential to know where you are starting and where you hope to be.

Also, does the promo item match your mission? Is it aligned with your brand? You’ll want to use the same logo and color scheme currently associated with your nonprofit. That way, there is a clear relationship between the item and your organization.

And, ensure that the product will be useful for your specific audience and speak to their needs. Items that work well for one demographic may not be ideal or make sense for another group.

Promotional products are a marketing tool, and like any marketing device, they reflect your brand. This not only refers to the content you imprint on the items, but also the items themselves. It can be tempting to order a high quantity of an inexpensive promotional item, and there are several economical options available. However, just remember that any item you put out there branded with your logo reflects your brand as a whole. If you’re promoting your organization with an item that is flimsy or the decoration does not hold up, potential leads will associate that with your nonprofit’s abilities, even if you’re doing good work. How your organization is perceived—even subconsciously—is the foundation for all you do.

6 Nonprofit Promo Ideas

Need some ideas for your nonprofit’s next promo campaign? Check out these 6:

Tote Bags

branded tote bagIt’s estimated that promotional bags generate an average of nearly 6,000 impressions during their lifetime. That’s more than any other promo product. With eco-friendly alternatives being popular and sought after, branded reusable bags are a solid choice to give to donors. They’re an inexpensive option that’s sure to be used and seen.

Branded Apparel

Shirts, jackets, vests, hats, socks…the list of apparel items available for branding with your logo is nearly endless. Like bags, clothing items are highly visible. Branded t-shirts make great giveaways, and nicer jackets are perfect as thank you gifts for top donors.

Desk Items

It’s always important to know your audience. Promo is no exception. If you know that many of your donors work in a corporate setting, desk items can be a way to create promo donors will see and use every day. Popular items include, journals, padfolios, mousepads, water bottles, and tech gear, like phone stands and power banks.

Drinkware

branded patterned water bottles

Water bottles are useful in the office and on the trail. Drinkware, like water bottles, thermoses, tumblers, and insulated mugs are ideal promotional items. They’re functional in a variety of settings, and they travel with you. Whether your donors are going on a hike or heading into a meeting, they can carry your branded drinkware with them.

Giveaways

If your organization is hosting or attending events regularly, having promotional items to give away is an effective lead generation tool. Depending on your audience, your items may differ. Some popular choices include pens, key chains, note pads, lip balms, and stress balls.

High-End Gifts

While your giveaways may be high quantity and low priced, the promo market also includes higher quality items that you can reserve for special donors or board members. When you want to say thank you in a special way, look to gift sets, ball point pens, embroidered jackets, or a debossed journal.

Wear Your Mission on Your Sleeve… Literally

nonprofit promo slogan tshirts

Apparel is often used in a nonprofit context to outfit volunteers working on your behalf, as staff clothing or donor gifts, and to sell at events and on your website. When it comes to adding branded apparel to an organization’s marketing mix, a thoughtful approach to the personal side of apparel and how you decorate your shirts, hats, scarves, etc. is an opportunity to make a lasting visual impression.

Our preferences in what we wear is a very personal choice.  When considering an investment in branded apparel, metaphorically try taking your organizational hat off and putting your personal hat on. Ask yourself, what would I want to wear if I was given a shirt or hat from this organization?

Having your logo on a garment means something different to you, as a staff member of your organization, than it does to a donor, volunteer, or consumer. To you, it’s a uniform of sorts; you ARE the logo on the shirt. And while a donor, volunteer, and consumer may relate similarly to wearing your organization’s logo, there is still a fine distinction between you and them about the meaning of wearing your brand.

So what to do? Consider adding your slogan, tag line, or value proposition statement to the garment. Doing so bridges the gap between staff and constituent with a common theme that starts conversations and elicits emotion and identity for your cause. Doing so puts the emphasis on the statement more than the organization. Your statement is the “why” people identify with your organization, volunteer, and give money.

It also helps to keep the statement or slogan short and sweet. Humor or levity help when it’s appropriate. Applying a unique artistic branding element to the slogan helps build awareness and alignment for when it’s used in various ways and mediums. Bold creative can work, but big and gaudy may not depending on the demographics of your constituency.

At the end of the day, if you’re spending hard-earned money on apparel, think it through and design it so people will actually wear it… and wear it happily.

Promotional products can be a major way to increase fundraising dollars and make more potential donors aware of your brand. If you want to make promo a part of your campaigns, Paw Print can help! Explore our online catalog, or give us a call at 865-2872 to start the conversation.

Envelope Creativity Boosts Response Rates

Entrepreneur opening a padded envelopeOne of the biggest hurdles of direct mail? Getting people to open the envelope.

Postcards and self-mailers have the advantage of standalone, eye catching content. The graphics are immediately visible, compelling the recipient to read on.

But for many mail pieces, an envelope is essential. Using an envelope doesn’t have to be limiting, however. In fact, today’s printing technology allows envelopes to be more personalized and attractive than ever before. Customization turns envelopes from basic commodities to effective direct marketing tools.

Why Direct Mail?

cartoon envelope with megaphone

In our digitally saturated world, direct mail stands out:

Creative & Customized Envelopes: Reach More of Your Audience

Basic return address printed envelopes have long been a standard for many businesses. While they get the job done, inkjet technology has made it possible to completely customize envelopes, making your campaigns more personal, relevant, and compelling for your audience.

Some reasons to personalize envelopes for your business or organization include:

Increase Visibility

Generally, envelopes have the information necessary to get the mail piece to the recipient. But there’s a lot of white space left over that can be used to include a compelling call to action. You may not always open envelopes, but you’re sure to look at the outside to see who the mail piece is from. An envelope is a highly visible space available to tee-up the theme or message of your campaign.

Improve Open & Response Rates

Creative envelopes not only enhance visibility. They also raise curiosity, making recipients more likely to open and respond to your message. You can use the envelope to create a sense of urgency, letting recipients know there is a limited amount of time in which to respond.

Send a Timely Message

Customized envelopes have the advantage of timeliness. You can print for a specific theme, referencing your current campaign or a seasonal or time sensitive offer.

Stand Out from the Crowd

group of pencils one red among the blue
Background image created by Yanalya – Freepik.com

Giving a unique touch to your mailings separates you from your competition. In a mailbox of white envelopes, an envelope with color and interesting graphics stands out, making you more memorable than your competitors.

Segment, Budget, Personalize

The ability to customize means that you can create envelope designs that are more personal to the recipient. Maybe your mailing is targeted to past customers, or to your top donors. Whoever your target audience may be, you can make your envelopes specific to that group and the goals you have for them. With Variable Data Printing, you can even print each individual’s name on the envelope as part of the call to action.

No Overstock or Rush

When you print custom envelopes at the time of production, your printer can produce just enough for your mailing. That way, you won’t have to worry about storing overstock, or having a pile of extra envelopes specific to a campaign that you won’t be able to use again. On the flip side, you won’t have to stress about coming up short and placing a rush order. If the printer needs a few extras to finish the job, they can print more at no added cost to you.

The creativity of your imagination is the only limit when it comes to printing envelopes. Custom sizes, stocks, and colors are all available, making it easy to create a stand out envelope for your next campaign.

Ready to step up your direct mail? At Paw Print, we can assist you every step of the way, from designing your mail piece to printing to mailing fulfillment. Contact us today to get started!

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Key Reasons Your Nonprofit Needs Branding

Chalk board with branding and marketing words

When you consider the word “branding,” what comes to mind? You may think of well-known companies like Apple or Target, that advertise on a large scale and whose characteristics are immediately recognizable to most of us, who come into frequent contact with them.

But the concept of branding is just as important for small businesses as it is for large companies. And, it’s an essential piece of increasing awareness for nonprofits as well.

The obvious reason for nonprofit organizations to spread awareness of their brand is to increase donations and build a reliable donor base. However, according to the Stanford Social Innovation Review, many nonprofits are stepping up their brand management in order “to explore the wider, strategic roles that brands can play: driving broad long-term social goals, while strengthening internal identity, cohesion, and capacity.”

Why Should You Build a Brand?

Like any other entity, your nonprofit has a unique set of goals, characteristics, and stories. When you bring these together to form a recognizable and repeatable persona, you have a brand. The first thing most people think of when they hear the word brand or branding, is an entity’s logo. While this is one branding element, it’s only the beginning. The style, graphics, and words your organization uses to communicate all convey your brand.

But what can branding do for your nonprofit?

Differentiate

Creating a brand around your nonprofit allows you to separate yourself from the crowd. There are a lot of nonprofits out there (over 4,000 in VT alone!) and invariably there are other organizations with the same general mission as yours. To make a connection with donors and bring precious fundraising dollars your way, you must tell a story that illustrates the unique mission of your nonprofit.

Illustrate Your Goals

black and yellow dart board with multicolored darts
Business image created by Waewkidja – Freepik.com

Helping donors to understand the specific goals your organization is working to achieve is a critical reason for developing a brand. Branding allows you to project your mission as an indelible piece of your organization. Potential donors can recognize these goals as the core of your brand, helping to reinforce your purpose.

Establish Authority

Nonprofits follow the same sales and marketing rules as businesses—it’s going to take multiple touches before a potential donor will make a gift. They will have to encounter your organization several times until it becomes familiar to them. Having a brand allows you to create one cohesive image that you can present to the world. The more a potential donor sees that image, the more recognizable you become, and the more likely they are to engage with you. Branding can also give you a professional image, increasing your sense of authority.

Strengthen Internal Identity

man and woman volunteers posing
Business image created by Peoplecreations – Freepik.com

The Stanford publication referred to branding as a way to reinforce internal identity. While your brand works to become familiar to potential donors, establishing a brand also helps to give your employees, volunteers, and board members something to rally around. They will feel like part of a team, helping to strengthen internal bonds.

Importance of Consistent Branding

A key piece of developing a brand is consistency. By constantly presenting your nonprofit using the same language, imagery, and message, you’re helping to build awareness and create a reliable image for your audience.

You should update all your marketing and fundraising materials to reflect your branding. Your social media content should echo what a visitor to your website or a recipient of your postcard will see. Consistency helps to establish the notion that you have clear, defined goals, and the experience and authority to achieve them.

Consistency can also apply to the frequency of your communications. You may have more activity leading up to an event, but work to stay in regular contact with your audience without being overwhelming. For instance, you could send one mailing per month, rather than several mailings during your campaign period and none the rest of the year.

The Power of Print

Like many nonprofits, you may be using direct mail for your fundraising campaigns. If so, you know that direct mail is an effective way to spread awareness and increase gifts. In part, this is due to the physical nature of a mail piece in our digitally saturated world. It reflects the power of print to connect with an audience—print boasts a 70% higher recall than digital.

In addition to direct mail, do you have other print collateral, such as business cards, brochures, banners/signs, or letterhead? These are all elements that contribute to the building of your brand. Where do you source these from?

By collaborating with a single source for all your printing, you can ensure that the donor experience is consistent. Each print piece can be consistent in terms of color, paper stock, and the overall look and feel.

Also, when you work closely with a source for something as important as fundraising, that source truly comes to know your organization, and can suggest avenues to explore that will accurately and effectively reflect your organization.

Want to talk about building your brand? Paw Print can assist with all your printing, mailing, design and promotional product needs. Contact us today!

 

5 Ways Direct Mail Enhances Digital Fundraising

Emails with young woman holding a tablet

Are your fundraising campaigns multi-channel yet?

Digital developments are changing the way many non-profits fundraise. If you aren’t making use of digital channels to reach your donors, you risk falling behind.

While digital is vital to success, the most effective fundraising campaigns make use of direct mail and digital resources to create a cohesive donor experience, increase gifts, and be more impactful.

Here are 5 reasons to implement digital strategies into your next fundraising campaign:

1) Increase Your Reach

Direct mail is popular because it’s personal. There’s a lot to be said for being able to hold something in your hand, especially when it’s been personalized to you. We are inundated with so many emails throughout the day, and it’s easy for your message to get lost in the shuffle. At the same time, we’re receiving fewer pieces of physical mail. When we do receive mail, it gets our attention. According to MobileCause.com, donors are 3 times more likely to give online due to receiving a piece of direct mail versus an email.

man with megaphone to communicate
Background vector created by Dooder – Freepik.com

Direct mail is effective for making a connection with donors. And it’s even more effective when combined with other methods of communication. It’s likely that your donor base is a diverse group that wants to receive communications in different ways. Donors may be more likely to give online after receiving direct mail. But they also are more likely to act on direct mail if they are getting your message across multiple channels.

2) Create a Cohesive Experience

Because you have so many channels at your disposal, and you know that receiving messages across platforms increases giving, it’s important to be consistent with the look and feel across platforms. That means the same language, tone, imagery, color scheme, message, etc. should be reflected in each piece of fundraising material that you produce.

If you want to make online giving a part of your strategy, start by creating a landing page on your website consistent with your mailing. You can use the mailing to get the donor’s attention. Then, drive them to go to the landing page to learn more, engage with you, and ultimately make a donation. You can continue the theme throughout your email, social media, and other print communications.

One way to make the donor experience more compelling is to have a story at the core of your message. Maybe it’s a specific individual or group who has benefited from your organization. You can tell their story through video, imagery, and quotes, using these throughout your communications and campaign period. The repetition of these elements also helps to instill a sense of familiarity with your organization.

3) Make it Easy to Give

According to Nonprofit Source.com, 25% of donors complete their donations on a mobile device. And, 51% of high-wealth donors prefer giving online. Statistics consistently show that online giving is growing from year to year and that donors appreciate the ease of giving digitally.

However, simply having an online giving platform doesn’t mean you’re creating the best possible giving experience for your donors. Put yourself in their shoes, and go through the process of donating through your site or app.  If there are many steps to making the donation, or your platform does not work for mobile devices, you may want to make some changes. Look into using QR codes or text to give to make your donors’ mobile experience even more user-friendly.

4) Step Up Response Rates

Would you be surprised to learn that annually, 1.3 billion pieces of mail fail to reach the intended recipient? Or that 20% of addresses on nonprofit mailing lists are outdated? This means that 1/5 of the direct mail pieces you send out have the potential to be a dead end, with your message not reaching the recipient.

List hygiene digital data That’s why list hygiene is so important. Mailing to bad addresses not only decreases your reach. It also costs you money and gives you a lower campaign response rate. Plus, it’s simply ineffective. Having a smaller, more accurate list ensures that you’re investing your resources more wisely.

One effective investment to make to improve the quality of your mailing list is to add an Ancillary Services Endorsement on the mail piece at least once per year. By adding “Return Service Requested” to the mailing panel, the post office will return both undeliverable and change of address pieces for you to update your list from. You’ll pay the going postage rate for the returned pieces. But considering the money wasted on undeliverable pieces you are not aware of, this is money well-spent.

You can use digital communications to encourage donors to update contact and address info throughout the year, while keeping them apprised of the goings on at your organization.

5) Provide Value

Donors give because they feel a connection with your organization or mission. This means that your communications with them must be more than just an ask.

Send direct mail simply to stay in touch with donors and provide them with updates about your nonprofit. You can use digital resources to engage donors beyond the giving process. Create a blog for your organization that encourages donors to comment and share. A blog also helps to establish your authority when you write about topics that affect or are related to your nonprofit’s mission. You can direct donors to your blog through both direct mail and digital channels, helping them to understand the goals you’re working to achieve and creating more motivation to give. Blogging is also one of the best SEO strengthening tools in your digital marketing and fundraising toolbox.

Ready to make direct mail a part of your fundraising strategy? At Paw Print we specialize in direct mail fundraising appeal campaign production, taking your mailing from design to print to fulfillment. Contact us today to start the conversation.

Make Your Appeal to Out of State Donors

Drawing of man talking on phone to woman in speech bubble
Business vector created by Freepik

Donor acquisition is one of the most important functions of nonprofit fundraising. Your donors make the good work you do possible. Without a regular and tactical practice of enlisting new donors , both socially and financially, your organization would be challenged to stay afloat.

It goes without saying that stewarding your current donor base is essential—they’re the ones who’ve continued to champion your cause and are more likely to give consistently, and grow their gifts, over time.

Conversely, compelling new donors to give is more difficult than maintaining a relationship with a regular donor. However, it’s important to not leave donor acquisition efforts for hard times. Your donor base is constantly changing, and your approach to acquiring new donors should be constant as well.

Connecting with Out of State Donors

Drawing of two women talking
Business vector created by Dooder – Freepik.com

A significant component of attracting new donors, and maintaining current donors for that matter, is conveying a clear value proposition that you deliver. What ties them to your cause? Your organization? Your purpose? How you talk to donors depends largely upon what messages they are receptive to.

For nonprofits that serve a local community or an entire state, it’s likely that the bulk of your donors live locally. However, over time your donor base will change as people change employment, retire, and transition to out of state residence, either full-time or seasonally.

You may currently have or want to reach out to donors who you determine have ties to your service area. A good place to start is with former residents and also part-time residents who regularly visit your area but live elsewhere seasonally.

It’s easier to determine motivation for contributors who live near your organization. You may see them at events, and their contribution could be a natural desire to create a better community where they will live and work.

But out of state donors can be more elusive. And the message you use to reach them will probably need to be different than those of local constituents. Determining their connection to your organization or location is a critical piece of that message.

To acquire these non or semi-local donors, you need to dig a little deeper to try to make a connection with them due to their removed primary residence. Why have they decided to pay additional property taxes to maintain a presence in your locale? An important set of data for acquiring donors near and far gets personal. Ask questions such as:

  • What social values are important to you?
  • Why do you give?
  • What does it mean to you to contribute to your community?
  • What is unique or memorable about the community you once resided in before moving?
  • Do location, community, financial, family or other qualities influence your decision to have a second home here?
  • What does “making a positive difference” mean to you?

These kinds of questions can be asked of both current and potential donors to better understand your out of state donor base and where you fit into their lives. You may not ask these questions in such a direct manner. But you’ll want to get people thinking about these topics in a way that initiates a response with the information you’re looking for.

Acquiring Donors with Direct Mail

woman reading mail at desk

So how do you do this? As with any campaign, you first need to know what you want to achieve. Evaluate past data to set clear, specific goals.

Do you want to acquire a specific number of new donors? Do you want to increase donor acquisition by a percentage from year to year? Even if you’re seeing positive trends regarding new donors, it’s important to keep improving. When you have a goal in mind for a campaign, it’s easier to judge whether the campaign was effective. Goals also allow you to understand how your data is changing over time.

Whether you’re looking to acquire new donors or bring lapsed donors back into the fold, the easiest way to determine what matters to them is to simply ask. While much of your fundraising content may focus on asking for a financial gift, you could approach this kind of campaign without addressing that angle.

Instead, use direct mail as the basis for an introduction or reintroduction to the potential donor. If you can, acknowledge their connection to you and to your region. Maybe they own property here, or have business and investments tied to the region. Also speak to your role. What do you do for your community?

Use that connection to promote a compelling reason/purpose for these individuals to give. Develop a short series of questions that will help you to better understand what matters to these potential donors and what your organization means to them. A best practice with this kind of campaign is to create a landing page on your website tied to the direct mail piece, where recipients can go to submit their responses.

You can build upon this initial mailing with subsequent mailings to engage the donor, build awareness and trust, and make the ask for financial contribution.

Building a list of potential donors and effectively reaching them with a compelling campaign takes time. Donors will interact with you multiple times before making a gift. It’s important to keep up a consistent strategy, so that your message is sure to be heard.

At Paw Print, we specialize in nonprofit fundraising appeal production. Contact us today to start reaching and acquiring more donors for your organization.

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Understand Your Audience for Marketing Success

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Background vector created by Freepik

How well do you know your audience?

It’s a question that marketers and fundraisers regularly ask themselves. You may have a general idea of the types of people who are purchasing your products or giving to your cause. But crafting compelling messages requires a deeper knowledge of what resonates with your constituents. The most effective campaigns are those that reach people on a relevant, personal level.

To create content that an audience connects and engages with, you need to understand what motivates them to act. Look beyond basic demographics, like age, gender, location, and income (though those are important to know). Think about what your typical customer needs—what will help them achieve a desire or resolve a fear? And, what are those desires and fears?

Once you know what drives your customers, current and potential, you can craft marketing messages that speak to and resonate with them. To learn what those messages are, you can consider specifics about what you’re offering. Why would someone buy this item? What are they hoping to achieve? Or, why would someone give to my organization? What outcomes are they hoping to achieve or be a part of?

The best way to understand what your audience wants and what matters to them is to talk to them. Send an email campaign asking your list what topics or offers they’d like to see more from you. Reach out on social media, encouraging people to share their opinions on blog posts and hot topics. Better yet, sit down face to face with a top client and talk about their needs and experiences, and how you can help them get where they want to be. This kind of information is invaluable as you work to better reach your customers and enhance their trust in you.

How Does Your Audience Consume Content?

young woman seated in cross legged position on floor using white tablet
People image created by Nensuria – Freepik.com

One piece of knowing your audience is understanding how they consume media and access your content. Your current marketing strategy may consist of a blog, email list, and a social media page or two. You’re proud of the content you produce, both visually and for the quality of the information.

But it’s important to remember that marketing is a constantly changing playing field. By sticking with methods you’ve used for a long time without understanding their effectiveness, you may be investing time and money into a channel or strategy that just isn’t performing.

It’s not to say that your current strategy isn’t working. It’s just important to make sure that it is, and to be aware of which channels have the greatest reach with your audience.

Take a good look at your marketing channels and ask yourself questions. How are people finding your blog? Are they going directly to your blog page, clicking an email link, or finding the post on social media? Are recipients opening your emails? How are people engaging with you?

Also think about your target audience. Are they using email? Are they on Facebook? If you want to connect with older folks, for instance, focusing on Facebook might not be as effective as direct mail.

Your current audience could also be different than the audience you’re looking to reach. Maybe your customer base largely consists of an older demographic, and you want to reach more millennials. If so, it’s important to recognize that a strategy that worked for one group may not work as well with another and to determine, over time, what channels to invest in to ensure you’re reaching your intended audience.

And, you may be surprised by what people are consuming and how they do so. Millennials, for instance, consistently open direct mail and report that they enjoy reading mail, more so than older generations.

Measure for Marketing Success

You want to gain a better understanding of what your audience finds compelling. But where to start?

Before you take on any new marketing strategies, you need to know what’s currently working for you and what isn’t. Tracking your marketing is essential for improving response rates and achieving new goals.

drawing of hand holding magnifying glass over line graph
Infographic vector created by Photoroyalty – Freepik.com

Depending on the marketing channels you use, there are different ways to track effectiveness. On social media, it’s relatively easy to see what types of posts are performing best with your followers. What content is getting the most shares and comments? Those are the types of posts you want to share more often.

If you’re using email automation software, there are usually metrics available that track data. These include open and click-through rates, unsubscribes, and bounces. For your website, you can use an application like Google Analytics to understand how many visitors are coming to your page, how they get there, and what pages/links they go to on your site.

Direct mail can also be very trackable. Include a coupon or return envelope that the recipient will have to return to you. Or try using a code that must be entered online to receive the offer. When you know how many pieces of mail led to an action, you can determine what content generates a response.

Email and direct mail are also effective for A/B testing. This involves creating two versions of a campaign that differ by one element. For email, it could be two different subject lines, or two different offers or images for direct mail. Try sending out each version in equal quantities. Then, you can track which email is opened more or which imagery or words lead to more gifts from donors.

In addition to reaching more people more effectively, tracking makes it easier to work toward and achieve marketing goals. Setting specific goals for your business or organization is important. Say you want to increase customer retention rates by 15%. Tracking customer data allows you to monitor exactly who is purchasing from you and how certain content or offers are affecting return business.

Now that you know the importance of tracking, you can take on new campaigns with measurement in mind.

 Targeting

target with arrow in center surrounded by graphic representations of marketing elements
Background vector created by Makyzz – Freepik.com

A benefit of having more knowledge is being able to better target your audience. As you get to know your constituents, you’ll likely find several different groups within the larger group of your customer base. Rather than sending a generic message to your whole list, you can now craft multiple messages around what will motivate each group. Sending more targeted, relevant messages to your audience will increase response rates and engagement with you.

Targeting is possible across marketing channels. With direct mail, you can segment your mailing list into groups. Instead of a single mailing, you can create multiple versions of your mail piece with different wording, imagery, or offers, sending a different version to each group based on their needs and interests. You could also send a mailing to just one group if you have something specific for them.

Email is similar. Lists can be segmented based on how often recipients want to receive content from you, the types of content they want to receive, whether they are part of a customer loyalty program, etc. On your blog, you can create content for a variety of categories based on customer interests. At Paw Print, we write blog posts that are B2B and B2C related, and other posts with information specific to our nonprofit clients.

While social media posts appear to all your followers, you can target any ads that appear on social media sites. Today’s algorithms allow targeted ads that will appear to very specific audiences, such as women between 35 and 50 who are interested in travel.

Need help reaching your audience? At Paw Print & Mail, we’re prepared to assist you with developing marketing strategies that are targeted for your intended audience. From direct mail to copywriting to promotional products and content marketing, we have the tools to make your message heard. Contact us today!

A Special Way To Thank Major Donors

woman in white t-shirt holding thank you gift box
Ribbon image created by Valeria_aksakova – Freepik.com

One of the most important pieces of the nonprofit fundraising puzzle is discovering new and creative ways to thank your donors. Promotional products are an increasingly popular way to say thank you to donors while also spreading awareness of your organization.

When you add promo to your fundraising strategy, you may want to do so by developing a gift program. Presenting your top donors with a special gift in the form of a promotional product can solidify your relationship with them. And, when you provide a donor with a quality item they’ll be using frequently, you’re helping to spread the word about your organization even further.

What to Remember

A good practice to follow when gifting promotional products is to use the gift as a surprise. Depending on what the item is, you can present it before the donation is made or after. However, you want to avoid presenting the item in a transactional way, as in, give $50 to receive this mug. A study conducted at Yale found that we feel positive about giving when it instills a sense of altruism in us, a feeling that we’ve selflessly done something to help others. We’re giving to get that feeling. But, when we know that our contribution will be rewarded in some way (my dollars for this mug) we tend to feel selfish rather than selfless, leading us to give less.

Instead, presenting a potential donor with a gift before a donation is made instills a sense of reciprocity. And surprising donors with something special after they’ve selflessly given helps build a positive feeling for your organization.

In addition to when you present the gift, consider how you will present it. The language you use is important. Donors will feel more positive about the gift if you present it as a tool to further your mission. You can tell the donor how their use of the item will help to spread awareness of your organization, increasing their engagement with you and making them eager to use the gift you’ve given.

Top Gifts to Thank Top Donors

brown leather journal with tie laying on wooden boards
These debossed leather refillable journals have a soft feel and a high-end look donors will love.

While you may have varying levels of gifts to thank all your donors, your top donors deserve something special. These are the individuals who consistently make game-changing contributions to your organization. This often means financially, but it may also be someone who invests their time and expertise into helping your organization to grow and its beneficiaries to shine.

Whomever you are looking to thank, here are some gifts your donors will appreciate:

Branded Journal

Journals and portfolios are a popular item on today’s promo market. With a range of sizes and styles, it’s easy to find an item that fits with your brand and your message. Decorating a journal with a deboss or hot foil stamp is a subtle and professional way to brand, giving the item added texture and depth.

Etched Pen

There’s no getting around it—we spend a lot of time in front of screens. However, there are still times when only a hand-written note will do. You can make the writing experience enjoyable for your donors by presenting them with a higher-end metal or hardwood pen. Decorating the pen with an etching will give it a classy look.

black metal pen etched with Panasonic logo

Apparel Item

young woman wearing red fleece jacket and khaki pantsA high-quality apparel item embroidered with your logo is something many donors would love to receive, and to wear. Apparel is the most popular group of items in the promo industry. And it represents a major way to spread awareness about your organization. You could present your top donors with an embroidered jacket, vest, hat, scarf or socks. They’ll be sure to wear the item throughout the day, bringing your name with them to everyone they meet.

red metal hydroflask water bottle imprinted with white CSI logoDrinkware Items

I use a water bottle and a travel mug nearly every day. It’s likely many of your donors do as well. It’s important to me that these items are durable and functional, and that they are representative of myself and the things that matter to me. Presenting your top donors with a stainless steel etched tumbler or water bottle is sure to make an impression, both on your donors and their friends, families, and coworkers.black coffee mug with Fenton Construction Logo

Want to make your gift even more personal? Some products can be decorated using variable data printing methods. This means that in addition to including your nonprofit’s logo or tagline on the gift, you can personalize each item with the name or initials of the donor. If you want to wow your donors with a unique gift, this is the way to go.

Paw Print & Mail offers a wide variety of promotional products, and we’re ready assist you with finding the right promo for your donors. Explore our online catalog, or contact us today and start promoting your nonprofit with promotional products.

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