10 Tips to Increase Donor Loyalty

Donor_Loyalty_Paw_Print_And_Mail
Money vector created by Freepik

Think how hard it would be if you had to find a new pool of donors every year just to keep your nonprofit going. Not only would it be exhausting—it might even be impossible.

Which is why it’s important that there are donors who choose to give on a regular basis. Statistics show that repeat donors give more to nonprofits, not just over time, but also per gift. Which makes sense—once a donor has become invested in a nonprofit, they are often willing to give more to increase the organization’s impact.

Repeat donors represent a significant chunk of fundraising dollars, and are a key piece of achieving year-end fundraising goals. But donor retention is following a troubling trend.

According to a 2016 report from the Fundraising Effectiveness Project, while nonprofits are seeing an increase in the number of new donors, the overall donor retention rate in the U.S. has been below 50% since 2008—and it’s declining.

With 1.5 million nonprofit organizations in the U.S., and over 4,000 just in the state of Vermont, there’s more pressure than ever for your nonprofit to retain donors and raise the necessary amount of fundraising dollars. One of the best ways you can ensure your organization will meet its fundraising goals is by focusing your efforts on increasing donor loyalty. Here are 10 ways you can work to do just that.

1. Treat your Donor as A Friend

We’re talking about increasing your donor retention rates, but it’s not about a number—it’s about building meaningful relationships with your donors. A gift is a step in your relationship with the donor, not just a transaction that increases funds. This may seem obvious to you if you work for a nonprofit, but it’s important to always keep in mind as you look for ways to enhance your fundraising efforts and ensure donors remain involved with your organization. Make sure there are multiple ways your donors can engage and interact with you, through blogs, social media, email, and more.

2. Create Trust with Your Donors

One of the key components of developing deeper relationships is building trust. Creating trust in your relationships with your donors is essential to engendering loyalty. If you are consistently dependable when it comes to communicating with donors, thanking them, and making significant impacts with your fundraising dollars, donors will want to keep giving to your organization.

3. Keep in Touch

Donors typically need multiple “touches” from an organization before they commit to making a gift. According to Professor Adrian Sargeant, a fundraising professor and philanthropy expert in the UK, 53% of donors stop giving because of a lack of communication from the nonprofit. It’s important to communicate with donors regularly, with updates on how their dollars are being spent and what’s going on at your organization. Keep lines of communication open between you and the donor so that they truly come to feel they are a part of your organization.

Communicate_With_Donors_Paw_Print_and_Mail
Background vector created by Dooder – Freepik.com

It’s essential to include touches that don’t ask for a gift of any kind, but are solely meant to inform the donor. Don’t structure your communications with donors based on giving, only to disappear from their lives once they’ve made a gift.

 

And, it’s just as important to give donors the option to request fewer communications from you. If they are hearing from you too often for their liking, they are less likely to give than if they have the choice to hear from you when they want to. Creating options for your donors helps your organization to build greater credibility.

4. Create Specific Fundraising Appeals

A major reason why donors don’t give is from a sense of futility. It may be hard to put their donation into context: how is my $30 really going to make a difference?

That’s why specific appeals are so important. You need to be clear about the direct impact that donor’s funds will have. For example, you can say “your $50 gift will feed [x amount] of children for one month.” This type of appeal is compelling, because the donor can see exactly how their individual contribution can have an impact on someone’s life.

5. Make an Emotional Connection with Stories

Using stories to create an emotional connection is a common marketing tool, and they can be used in fundraising to give credence to the successes and struggles of your organization. When you tell a story about a specific individual who needs or is receiving help through your organization, you are giving donors a face that they will want to help. Stories are often about helping a prospect see themselves in the tale, and even if your prospective donor has never been in the exact situation, you will tap into their compassionate side and give them a compelling reason to give.

For your story to have the strongest impact, keep your donors updated. If you can show how someone was directly impacted by your organization, it helps donors to see the good work you are doing and will make them want to keep giving.

6. Establish Opportunities for Repeat Giving

Repeat_Giving_Paw_Print_And_Mail
Background vector created by Freepik

Instead of framing a donation as a one-time gift, use language that will compel your donors to turn their gift into a monthly or yearly contribution. Ensure there is a clear and easy process for making this happen.

7. Use the Language of your Donors

A key rule of copywriting is to write in the language of your prospect, and it’s true for donors too. You may use jargon or industry-specific terms when communicating with others in your organization, but technical or unusual terms have a greater chance of confusing your donors than convincing them to give.

If you speak and write in consistently clear language that the prospect will understand, they will see you as a resource for comprehending an issue and will feel a greater affinity for your organization as someone they can trust and relate to.

8. Reach Out to Lapsed Donors

Some of your donors may not have given in a while. But if they have in the past, you know that at one time they felt a deep enough connection to your nonprofit that they wanted to contribute. Lapsed donors are an important group you don’t want to overlook, and with the right communications from you, could return as regular donors.

9. Segment Your Donor Communications

Loyalty is built by adding personal touches. Your pool of donors is going to be at all different stages of the giving process, giving different amounts for different reasons. It’s easy to segment mailing lists and add personalization to your communications, and this should certainly be a part of your fundraising strategy. When you clearly speak to donors right where they are, they will like the added level of personality and feel they as an individual are important to the success of your nonprofit, rather than just a name on a list.

10. Always Say Thank You!

Thanking donors for their contributions is essential, so never neglect an opportunity to let your donors know how much their gift means to your organization. A simple thank you can turn a one-time donor into a champion for your cause.

Paw Print & Mail specializes in direct mail fundraising appeal campaigns. Contact us today to enhance your fundraising strategy.

Subscribe to our email list so you never miss a post from Paw Print!

4 Essential Copy Tips for Connecting with Prospects

Lead_Generation_Paw_Print_and_MailLead generation is an important piece of marketing any business, and if you’re reading this blog, cultivating leads is probably a topic that’s on your mind.

Writing strong copy is essential for lead generation. The right copy with the right message behind it will give your marketing campaigns a significant edge over your competition.

When you’re selling a product, you may think that hyping up the product and describing all of its desirable features is the best way to market it. This information has a place, but when you adopt this approach, you may be surprised that sales aren’t coming in the way you thought they would.

Why might this be happening? The most important factor in copywriting is not you, your business, or your product—it’s the prospect. If you want your prospects to engage with you, you must have a deep understanding of who they are and what matters most to them, and make that information critical to your copywriting process.

Here are four key tips for ensuring your copy will make the right connection with prospects.

1. Get to Know Your Prospect

Copywriting_Prospect_Paw_Print_And_Mail
Background vector created by Dooder – Freepik.com

One of the most important things to remember is that what is right for one prospect or product is not right for another. Your copy may be well-written and your message effective for a certain audience. But if it’s not the audience your product is meant for, your product is not going to sell.

That’s why it truly pays to take the time to identify and understand your prospect. Key demographics like age, gender, average income, and location are important, but for a truly effective sales message, these categories aren’t enough. You’ll also want to ask yourself, what are my prospect’s interests and worries? And go even deeper: what are their core beliefs and desires?

Develop a system or form that you can use to chart out information about your prospect, from the most basic to the most personal. When you get to the core of what really matters to your prospect, you can better target your message, and you will be making a deeper connection with your audience, leading to increased sales.

How do you find information about your prospect? While you may have a basic idea of who is purchasing from you, there are a few resources you can use to help get to the core of who your prospect is and what matters to them:

  • Read customer reviews, testimonials, and surveys
  • Get to know the product well and test it out yourself
  • Look at past promotions to see what was and was not effective
  • Talk to the individuals who developed the product—why did they create it?

Remember that each product you sell may have a different audience, or you may have multiple audience segments for just one of your products or services. Personalization techniques allow you to segment your audience, communicating a unique message to each group.

2. Create an Emotional Connection with Your Prospects

Think about a time when you went into a store to make a purchase. Maybe you encountered a pushy salesperson, who kept up a constant spiel of details about the product you were looking at, pressuring you to buy.

How did that make you feel? Did you just want to walk out of the store?

If you did, you’ve experienced a feeling many consumers have: prospects don’t like the idea of being sold.

So, how are you going to get any sales? You need to create an emotional connection with your prospects. While your product or service may have great features, the features alone are not going to be as compelling to a prospect.

Instead, consider the benefits. This is where knowing the struggles and desires of your prospects will be extremely helpful. If you can show how your product provides a benefit you know your audience is looking for, or how it will help them to achieve a goal or solve a problem, you will create a deeper connection with them.

Here’s an example. Say you’re writing copy about a new car model you are selling. Rather than structuring your message around the materials or technical features, you can focus on the notion of safety. Maybe your car is a sedan or SUV you plan to market to families, who are rightly concerned about getting everyone safely from one place to another. If you know your prospect, you’ll know that safety, comfort, and being good parents are important ideas for them, and you can market your product accordingly.

3. Story + Transition = Sales

One of the best ways to bring emotion to your marketing copy is by telling a story. Stories are an engaging way to show the benefits of your product or service.

An effective story could run like this: start in the middle of the story, describing an instance of a fear or desire you know your prospects have experienced to draw them in. Then, go on to show how your product will benefit the prospect by solving the fear or allowing them to achieve the desire.

You want the prospect to see themselves in the story. Use the story to bring to life the benefits your prospects want and demonstrate how purchasing your product will directly lead to those benefits.

Something to keep in mind when writing copy or a story is to market a transition. As a part of defining your prospect, you’ll want to think about where they are now as well as where they want to be.

We can use the example of the car to illustrate this. The prospect may be anxious about driving their current car because they feel it isn’t safe enough to protect their family in case of an accident. Where they want to be, and where your story can show them ending up, is in a place where they are able to relax and enjoy driving again because they know they’ve chosen the best car for their family to travel safely.

You want your copy to illustrate this transition is possible and will bring the desired benefits—but only if the prospect purchases your product.

4. Speak to Your Prospect

Copy_Language_Paw_Print_And_Mail
Business vector created by Dooder – Freepik.com

Language is an essential piece of copywriting. Even a compelling, emotional story will not be successful if you don’t write in the language of the prospect.

Formal and technical writing is not your friend here. This style certainly has its place, but marketing copy works best when you write the way you talk. It requires you to use words and phrases your prospects regularly use, written in a conversational, one-on-one tone.

In general, copy should be made up of short sentences and commonly used words, and free of jargon. The individuals who developed your product or service probably speak about it in technical terms, which may have little to no meaning for your prospects. It may seem like using these kinds of technical words will give your prospects the impression that your product is well-developed or backed by science and technology, but there is a greater chance you will end up confusing them.

Certain words will have certain meaning for certain groups, so, again, you want to be specific about who you’re marketing to. In a B2B context you may have more flexibility with technical terms that are commonly used in the industry of your audience, so some jargon may be appropriate.

Copywriting is an essential piece of the marketing process, but we know it can be hard to find the time to write copy that hits just the right note with your prospects. At Paw Print & Mail, we have the copywriting (and content writing) experience to help you reach your audience, so contact us today to get started on your next marketing campaign.

Subscribe to our email list so you never miss a post from Paw Print!

 

Copywriting vs. Content Writing

Copywriting_Content_Paw_Print_And_Mail
Business image created by Katemangostar – Freepik.com

Think about the last ad you saw, watched, or heard. Maybe it was a radio jingle that’s now stuck in your head. It’s catchy, right? And it was likely written by a copywriter.

Often the words “copywriting” and “content writing” are used interchangeably, but they’re actually quite different approaches to marketing, requiring different techniques to be successful. Though they function differently, copywriting and content writing ultimately have the same end goal: to generate leads that convert into sales. And both are essential tools of a well-rounded and successful marketing strategy.

So, what’s the difference? How can you make use of both to jumpstart your marketing?

What is Copywriting?

Advertisements are everywhere in our lives. We see them in print and on the web, hear them on the radio, and watch them on TV. Experts estimate that each of us is exposed to an average of 5,000 marketing messages per day.

Of course, our minds don’t register all of these messages, though many slip through our subconscious. We may only consciously register a handful of the ads that we see, and it may take multiple impressions before an ad sticks in our mind.

With so much competition out there, it’s critical that your message stands out and leaves an impression. That’s why good copy is so important. Think about slogans like Nike’s “Just Do It” or “I’m Lovin’ It” from McDonald’s. Hearing these phrases triggers an immediate association with the brand, and they have inspired brand loyalty.

These slogans are an example of good copywriting, and illustrate the basic idea of what copywriting is: short-form content written with the intent to drive sales. We can define copywriting as writing meant to persuade the reader to take an action, typically to purchase a product or service.

Copywriting appears on any kind of advertising content you can think of, including a direct mail piece, a website landing page, a digital or print advertisement, and a sales email. All these pieces function as channels to increase company sales. While copywriting is not branding, it works to fuse your products/services and your company personality together to create a brand identity.

It’s important to be concise with copy. You have a limited amount of time to gain someone’s attention, so your copy must be short enough to be consumed in one glance (think “Just Do It”) or compelling enough that readers will be intrigued and eager to read more. You can think of copywriting as a three-step process:

  • Create an emotional connection with your prospects by identifying a major pain point or desire.
  • Cultivate need by showing that escaping pain or achieving desire is possible for the prospect.
  • And position your product/service as the solution (with a call to action).

What is Content Writing?

In contrast, content writing is written to inform. It should also be engaging, if not entertaining, and it must align with your brand’s personality and voice. Though it still functions to increase sales, content writing does so in a less blatant way than copywriting.

Offer your customers informational content to help them solve problems in your area of expertise, in the form of a blog, video, ebook, or whitepaper. Customers will often do a great amount of research before committing to a purchase, and if you position yourself as an expert in your field, it will attract more sales in the long term. You can provide your customers with answers to questions before they even have to ask.

Through consuming your content over time, you will build trust with your audience, eventually converting them to customers. Content writing leads to sales by information and examples, rather than a snappy sales pitch. Since content writing doesn’t have to be as concise as copywriting, you can expand upon your topic and really show your knowledge.

It also has the added step of requiring search engine optimization (SEO). To ensure your content is found on the web, you’ll want to keep key words and SEO in mind when writing, as web searchers can ultimately become clients—but only if they can find your content. Content writing pieces are also the type of marketing content your customers will share, often on social media.

What Can Content and Copywriting Do for You?

Here’s how to think of the difference between the copywriting and content writing, using the example of Nike. Through copywriting we can learn that Nike is a fitness apparel company focused on being trendy and active, as well as advocating customers to achieve their fitness goals. This is their brand. With their content writing, Nike can establish themselves as qualified activewear providers by creating content to inform their audience on topics related to fitness, athletic footwear, and health/wellness goals.

Copywriting_Increase_Sales_Paw_Print_And_Mail
Business vector created by Dooder – Freepik.com

Want even more of a comparison? Check out this conversation between a professional copywriter and a content marketer.

The important thing is that neither copywriting nor content marketing works very well without the other. Including both copywriting and content writing in your marketing strategy is critical for development of a well-rounded marketing plan. Businesses need a concise sales pitch to drive sales and increase brand awareness. And long-form content is becoming more and more crucial to development of a brand’s story and credibility.

Both types of writing offer value to the customer, whether by showing them ways you can solve their problems or by providing them with high-quality information that they’ll find useful. They can be used in conjunction to turn leads from the prospect stage into return customers and ambassadors for your brand.

Though each type of writing requires a different thought process, both must be well-written, and require the writer to be in the mindset of the audience. The prospect is the most important person in the copywriting process, and you have to speak to them in ways they can understand and relate to. If you aren’t reaching your prospective audience, your marketing efforts will be for naught.

While writing is an essential piece of the marketing process, we know it’s challenging to find time to give your written content the attention it deserves. At Paw Print & Mail, we offer copywriting and content writing services that will help enhance your marketing strategy. Contact us today to get started on your next marketing project.

Subscribe to our email list so you never miss a post from Paw Print!

Get an Early Start on Your Year-End Fundraising

Year_End_Gift_Paw_Print_And_MailHoliday tunes, snowfall, and ringing in a new year—that all seems far away, doesn’t it? But whether we like it or not, the end of 2017 will be here before we know it.

The holiday season is busy for all kinds of reasons. And if you’re involved with year-end fundraising for a nonprofit organization, you know how hectic the last few weeks of the year can be. Nearly 1/3 of annual giving occurs in the month of December, with 12% of all giving occurring on the last three days of the year.

This creates a lot of pressure for nonprofits, as things get down to the wire. Just a few days can mean the difference between meeting annual fundraising goals or missing the mark, and being unable to ensure your nonprofit can still offer the same programs and services it currently does.

But even though a large portion of fundraising occurs in a short time period, the strategic planning for year-end giving can start at any time, even as early as January 1st!

Over 50% of nonprofits begin their year-end fundraising efforts in October, but the earlier you begin asking your donors to contribute, the sooner you can make a compelling ask. And starting early gets you ahead of the flurry of appeals appearing in mid-Fall.

Whenever you decide it’s time to begin your year-end appeals, here are some helpful tips to help you prepare for this critical time.

Develop Targeted Fundraising Goals

It’s critical to have targeted benchmarks to refer to throughout your year-end fundraising efforts. Your goals can be focused on the amount you hope to raise, as well as which donors you’re looking to target. You may be looking to increase your average gift size or donor base, or better reach your recurring donors. It’s also important to nail down early in the game what channels you will use to reach your audience as well as how often they will be used.

Center your campaign around a specific number, whether it’s a dollar amount you hope to raise or a percentage of donors you hope to increase. These numbers are helpful for measuring the progress you make throughout the fundraising period, as well as what adjustments you may need to make to stay on target.

Maintain a Consistent Marketing Sequence

Starting your campaign early gives you more time to develop a compelling sequence of appeals. It’s effective to connect with donors using a multi-channel approach, including direct mail, email, phone, and social media.

Though each of these pieces will be somewhat different, they should all echo the same theme, including colors, images, and key words. You want to inspire emotion in your donors, so frequently including an image and story of someone who has benefitted from your organization’s services could help tie your campaign together.

Donors may need multiple touches before they commit to a donation, so keeping your message and visuals consistent helps them stay connected to and develop a conversation with your organization, moving them along the path to making a gift. Using multiple points of contact over time allows you to introduce your fundraising plans without immediately asking for a donation, while still expressing your appreciation for your donors.

For some ideas of print appeals, check out our post comparing the use of appeal letters and greeting cards to connect with year-end donors.

Urgency and Personality

Two key ideas should be at the forefront when developing copy and design for your campaign: giving your donors the sense that your message is vital and pressing, and the notion that that donor’s particular contribution is imperative to your nonprofit’s fundraising success.

To indicate urgency, write in short sentences using powerful verbs. It may seem like giving your donors as much content as possible will aid them in making the decision to give, but readers will get lost in large paragraphs of text. Your words should create an emotional connection and inspire them to take action.

As a fundraiser, you probably know that fundraising letters are all about the donor. But it’s not always easy to find the right combination of words that will make your letter donor-centered. It’s tempting to make your communications about the needs, successes, and goals of your organization, and donors will want to have information about those.

But, in order for a donor letter to accomplish its goal, it must lead to a gift. The letter should be focused on crediting the donor for your organization’s achievements, and play to what the donor believes in and wants to accomplish by giving to your organization. Using the words “you” and “your” many times throughout your donor communications is critical.

Printing and data techniques allow you to personalize your letters with names and send different letters to different mailing lists. Our digital printing capabilities at Paw Print & Mail enable you to personalize an appeal in highly detailed ways that demonstrate your organization’s connection with your donors. Metrics like giving history, ask amounts, program preferences, and pre-populating remittance coupons are all possible and will add an appreciable lift to your campaign response rates and revenue.

You can also look at your donor base using an RFM scoring system, which indicates how recently a donor gave, how frequently they give, and how much they give. This will help you to better target your messaging. To be extra personal, send personalized appeals to the top 1% of your donors. If they’ve given large amounts in the past they are likely heavily invested in your organization, and it never hurts to show them how important they are to you and how you understand their hopes and objectives.

Make it Easy to Give

The purpose of your fundraising campaign is to raise funds, and your materials should make the donation process as easy as possible for donors. Part of having a multi-channel approach to fundraising includes the presence of digital resources that further educate your donor base and make giving simple.

Donate_Paw_Print_And-Mail

Digital sources should connect seamlessly to other communications, so that donors can easily transition from one source to another. Ensure your website is easy to navigate. Since donors are using mobile devices, you’ll want to use a responsive template for your website to encourage mobile donations, or at least make the text large enough to be readable on smaller screens. And keep the donation page simple, so that donors don’t have to think about what they need to do.

Any steps you take now to plan, create resources, and connect with donors will make things easier when December rolls around. If you have your year-end appeal strategy in order early, you can take more time to focus on events, personal visits with donors, and other end of year tasks.

We specialize in direct mail nonprofit appeal production. Contact Paw Print & Mail when you’re ready to develop your next fundraising appeal.

Subscribe to our email list so you never miss a post from Paw Print!

Reaching the Elusive Millennial

Who Are Millennials?

What goes through your mind when you hear the term “millennial”? It’s a word that seems to be everywhere these days. But who are millennials? What makes them tick and drives their decisions? And how can you communicate with them?

Millennial_Marketing_Paw_Print_and_Mail
Created by Javi_indy – Freepik.com

Understanding what a millennial is and how exactly you can reach them is an elusive concept, one that is often frustrating to marketers who are trying to connect with this generation. You may have experienced this yourself, and I have both good and bad news for you. Since they are a very diverse group, no single marketing strategy is going to allow you to reach every millennial.

But the good news is, there are several approaches proven to resonate with millennials, and they’re not as hard to grasp as you may think.

Watch this video to get a clearer idea of who millennials are and what’s important to them:

Millennials have a different world-view, and need to be marketed to differently. They are a demographic that, in sheer numbers alone, is more populous than the baby boomers, giving millennials significant purchasing and decision-making power, a power that continues to grow annually.

Since millennials currently make up 25% of the U.S. population and will compose half of the American workforce by 2020, it’s important that marketers understand the best way to reach this demographic. Though they cannot be defined by income, career choice, or marital status, there are a few generalities that can be made:

  • It is largely agreed that individuals born between the early 1980s and the early 2000s are millennials.
  • As the first generation to grow up in the online era, they are used to digital communications and having more choices than previous generations.
  • Millennials are the most educated generation, though they also have more student debt.
  • Meaning, experiences, and causes are all important topics/ideas for them.

So, how can you successfully market to millennials?

1. Enhance Your Digital Marketing Strategy

Millennials are used to receiving information from many channels, and they tend to be multitaskers, plugged in across devices and sharing content across media. Consistency across platforms is key for engaging millennials with your marketing. Having a constant message and representation of your brand helps them to connect with your company.

Since so many millennials are accessing content on smartphones and tablets, you need to adopt a multi-channel strategy focused on mobile optimization. That may mean reworking your website into a responsive template, making it accessible and easily readable across devices of any screen size.

Millennials spend 48% more time watching video than the average online user, and 60% of them upload their own video, images, and blog content to the web. According to Hubspot, millennials are 247% more likely to be influenced by digital resources like blogs and social networking sites than previous generations.

That’s huge! And, it means that connecting with millennials requires you to develop a social strategy. Find the social media sites that work best for you and make them a part of your daily marketing plan. Adding a YouTube account or creating your own video content for Facebook or your website can also be effective. Millennials want to see helpful, informative content that they can engage with, so make sure your digital strategy offers them more than just what you’re trying to sell.

2. Embrace User Generated Content

The Baby Boomer generation relied on traditional forms of advertising, like radio and television ads. Marketers could expect that running an ad on TV would lead to many new sales and customers. Millennials, however, are much less likely to make a purchase decision from such an ad. What do they like? Brand interaction.

User generated content is one of the top ways that millennials make purchase decisions. They want to read honest reviews from customers who have purchased a company’s products or utilized their services. A study by Bazaarvoice found that 84% of millennials are influenced by user generated content when making purchase decisions, and 73% believe it is important to read others’ opinions before making a purchase.

If traditional ads are all about getting consumers to pay attention, making use of user generated content in your business is about building trust, which is high on the list of what millennials want from businesses. They like to do business with brands that are authentic and human. And they want to be able to interact and have a conversation with those companies.

What does this mean for you? Make it as easy as possible for public discussions about your brand to happen. Whether it’s on your website, a blog page, or your social media sites, get customers talking about your brand.

Facebook gives you the option of allowing reviews on your page, and this can be a great place to showcase what people are saying about your business. They might not always have good things to say, but a public forum is a place where you can show your willingness to resolve issues and take customer suggestions. Potential customers will see this, and it will help you to appear more human in their eyes.

Millenial_Review_Marketing_Paw_Print_and_Mail
Business image created by Photoroyalty – Freepik.com

Customers that love your brand will want to say so, and they will become brand ambassadors by talking to their friends and family about their experience. This group is more likely to respond to a peer review than a pop-up ad. You can also invest in influencer marketing, essentially building relationships with individuals that have influence over your customer base and can reach them through mediums like social media, in ways that your brand may not be able to.

Try giving customers a chance to bring their personality to your brand and be a part of brand decisions. For instance, Lays has given customers the ability to choose the next chip flavor, and Coca-Cola ran a campaign asking fans to get creative and interpret what the brand means to them in an artistic medium of their choice.

3. Personalize Direct Mail for Millennials

Millennials are used to digital marketing channels, and they rely heavily on what their community has to say about a brand. However, this does not mean that online methods are the only way to reach your millennial audience. US Presort, a direct marketing company based in New York City, conducted a surprising study about millennials and direct mail. Check out some results:

  • 84% of millennials regularly read through their mail, and 64% would rather find useful information in the mail than from an email.
  • 50% of millennials ignore digital ads, while only 15% ignore direct mail.
  • 90% of people between 25 and 34 believe direct mail is reliable.
  • 77% pay attention to advertising through direct mail, and over half have made a purchase from a direct mail offer.

Those are some pretty compelling statistics in favor of using direct mail to market to millennials. As we learned above, millennials like to hear personal stories when considering a brand, and one of the reasons direct mail is so popular is that it can be extremely personalized based on categories like purchase history, interests, and geographic region. Printing technology is also considerably advanced, so you can add to the tactile benefit of direct mail by incorporating creative folds, colors, and textures that will make your mail memorable.

4. Increase Engagement & Market an Experience

Millennials feel trust when a brand’s values align with their own, and those values often include a desire to support a cause or charitable mission. Nearly half of millennials are more willing to purchase from a company if that company supports a cause, and 37% will pay more for a product or service if it will help a cause they believe in. Philanthropy adds to the human side of your brand that is so important for millennials. If your business supports a cause, make sure people know about it.

Being able to give back while conducting business with your company changes the brand experience, and for millennials, experience carries more weight than a physical purchase. 78% of millennials prefer spending money on experiences rather than purchasing an item, and over half are spending more on events and experiences now than they ever have.

This may seem hard to work with if you’re in the business of selling a product, but it’s all about how you market it. Millennials are very receptive to storytelling in advertisements, and you can use that to your advantage. If you sell tents, for instance, make your ad about the experience of camping, how it allows you to relax, have fun, and connect with friends and family, rather than focusing on the physical and monetary benefits of the product.

You can also hold an event to get prospective customers more excited about the buying process. Attending the event heightens the experience of shopping, and it is a great opportunity for millennials to connect to the personality and human face of your business.

 

We recognize that crafting a marketing plan can be a challenge. Contact Paw Print & Mail and let us help you find the right strategy to market your business to millennials, or any demographic you are trying to reach.

Subscribe to our email list so you never miss a post from Paw Print!

Make Your Marketing Powerful With Humor

Quick! Stop what you’re doing and watch this video!

Did it make you laugh? Every time I see this commercial, it makes me smile.

It’s probably true that all of us can use a good laugh. Humor is a big component of what makes many advertisements successful, and can strongly affect the way we connect with and respond to marketing messages.

A key concept of marketing today is to not just provide your customers with products or services, but to also serve as a knowledgeable source of information about anything and everything related to what your company does. When you provide customers with helpful info, it builds trust in your relationship with them and gives you greater credibility.

That seems great, right? So much so that you probably want to focus the bulk of your content development efforts on generating information that will be the most useful to readers and help them to best achieve whatever it is that they are trying to achieve with your guidance.

But helpful information isn’t the only way you can build trust in your brand. Humor is an extremely effective piece of content marketing. And if you aren’t making use of it, you should be.

3 Key Benefits of Humorous Marketing Content

Think of the person you know who’s most likely to be the class clown. Is it sometimes hard to take them seriously? Probably. One of the arguments against using humor in marketing is that it can cause you to lose credibility and seriousness in the eyes of your audience—and if you lose those, your brand is in bad shape.

But guess what? This isn’t true, at least most of the time. Humor is not just a laugh as we skim through funny cat videos. Rather, humor creates a human connection.

Humor is a natural part of conversation, and it has an impact on our emotions, bodies, and brains. When you use humor in your marketing, it gives your business a human side. You’re not just a faceless source of information, but a real person who understands the emotions and problems of your customers and can help to solve them.

Because humor is so impactful, it has significant influential power. We watch funny videos of cats or ridiculous comedy movies because they are an emotional distraction, helping us to reduce stress. Humor inspires a feel-good reaction, and when you can make your customers laugh, it creates a connection between you and them. If you can make your audience feel less stressed, you are giving them the impression that your business can help to relieve their stress in relation to whatever services your company offers. You create a bond with them that makes your business more relatable.

Humor is also memorable and enhances learning. A study by Chegg, a textbook rental service, found that nearly 80% of college students remember ads that make them laugh. The basic purpose of an advertisement is to tell your audience who you are and what you do, while inspiring them to purchase your products or services. If your ad is memorable, it will stick in people’s minds. Though their brain is remembering the amusement they felt from viewing your ad, they will also remember what you’re offering, and will be more likely to go to you for their future needs.

Think about the above Volkswagen video, or the last piece of funny content you saw. After you laughed at it, what did you want to do? Since humor is such a key part of our conversations, it’s likely that you wanted to share the laughs with someone.

Humor has been cited as the key reason why content goes viral. When your audience shares your content, they are increasing your brand awareness as well as the positive emotions they associate with your business. Humor can also catch people off guard, lowering their defenses and making them more receptive to your message.

So, to recap—3 benefits of humor are:

  1. It creates a human connection between you and your audience.
  2. Humor makes your advertisements and content more memorable.
  3. Funny content is more likely to be shared, leading to greater brand awareness.

 Your Sense of Humor = Your Brand

There are also three reasons why marketers are afraid to make humor a part of their content development strategy:

  1. That fear of not being taken seriously
  2. The humor could fall flat, and no one will find it funny
  3. Humor can be offensive

While these are all valid concerns, instead of focusing on if you should use humor, consider how you will use it. Humor is a spectrum, and no single tone or joke is going to be appropriate for all businesses and audiences. This is where you need to know your brand—the level of humor you use should align with your brand values. If you make use of humor that is visible and shocking but ultimately offensive to your audience, you are more likely to lose customers than to gain them.

Your demographic is key to determining what kind of humor fits your business. Funny content is more likely to be shared, but if you are sacrificing your reputation to reach a larger audience, you’re alienating the customers that feel loyalty to your brand.

So, how can you be funny?

    • Keep it Casual: You can adopt conversational humor by sprinkling it into your content in small doses. Maybe you use some irony or exaggeration in your blog post, or add a funny component to your next advertisement. I like this ad from Amazon:

Amazon has become a popular online retailer for a wide demographic. This ad is heartwarming and made me smile, and you don’t lose sight of the ad’s message, which is the ease and speed of ordering from Amazon. At the same time, Amazon comes across as a fun company to do business with.

  • Just for Fun: Separate your more serious content with posts created just for laughs. Share a meme or video with the sole intent of putting a smile on your customer’s faces. You can relate them to your brand in some way, or they can be totally random.
  • Rock the Boat: Some brands have the flexibility to be edgy in their marketing, while others need to stick to tamer content. If you feel confident your audience would respond favorably to shocking content, go for it. Create an ad campaign that makes you stand out from competitors in your industry, and will get your audience talking.

The most important thing to remember with humor is to keep it simple. If your audience has to think too much about what you’re saying, they won’t be laughing, and you’ll lose the chance to make that powerful connection. But if you can get it right, a touch of humor could be just what your business needs to increase marketing success and develop a stronger relationship with your audience.

Subscribe to our email list so you never miss a post from Paw Print!